Schools celebrate ‘Read Across America’


Dr. Suess classics on display



(Jesse Campbell/Jefferson Post) Bill Naser, right, reads Dr. Suess stories to Mountain View Elementary School students on March 2, 2016.


JEFFERSON-Every American elementary school student at some point in their life, has read the works of literary giant Dr. Theodore Seuss Geisel.

Whether it was reading the “Cat in the Hat” or “Zax,” reading Seuss’s works is the quintessential experience for any grade school student during story time.

His prowess as a both a wordsmith and entertainer for millions of children spanning several generations crafted a lasting legacy that can still be seen and felt today.

In fact, you don’t have to go too far at any of the county’s three elementary school to see Seuss’s influence.

On Wednesday, Seuss’s presence was magnified at Mountain View Elementary with a plethora of birthday themed reading events to celebrate his literary contributions.

Held in conjunction with “Read Across America,” Mountain View students adorned the tall cylindrical red and white striped hats to pay homage to one of their favorite authors before making their way to class to hear a featured guest storyteller delight in some of the writer’s most read classics.

For the entire week, students participated in school wide events to remember the man and his works.

On Monday, students wore to school a shirt with a pocket and silly, wacky socks to bring of Seuss’s fictional characters to life. Alphabet pasta soup followed on Tuesday and the much of the school decked themselves out in Seuss style attire to celebrate the author’s birthday on Wednesday.

“Dr. Seuss was a writer for children’s books, so he encouraged a love of reading for children,” said MVE Literacy Specialist Ruth Turnmire on the importance of incorporating the author into the national reading promotion week. “And they established Dr. Seuss Day on his birthday. We just spread out different activities. As a school, we just wanted to the students to know the importance of reading.”

Turnmire added that students didn’t miss any instructional time during the week long foray and in many cases, teachers included Seuss’s readings into classroom learning.

Bill Naser, who has previously worked at the school as a reading tutor, read three select stories to a fifth grade class.

“Sneetches,” “Zax” and “Too Many Daves,” entranced students for nearly a half hour as students hung on to each and every of Suess’s clever rhyme schemes.

Naser said he, personally, enjoys Seuss’s works because they are fun to read.

“They also all have a moral without being preachy,” said Naser.

While the readings, like many of the author’s works, were rather short, Naser said the students seemed engaged in the stories.

In addition to the well crafted and memorable sentences, as well as phrases, Naser believes sound discipline and instruction by teachers made for receptive hearts and minds.

“They all seemed to have enjoyed it and listened very quietly,” said Naser.

Reach Jesse Campbell at 336-846-7164.

(Jesse Campbell/Jefferson Post) Bill Naser, right, reads Dr. Suess stories to Mountain View Elementary School students on March 2, 2016.
http://jeffersonpost.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Dr.-Suess2.jpg(Jesse Campbell/Jefferson Post) Bill Naser, right, reads Dr. Suess stories to Mountain View Elementary School students on March 2, 2016.
Dr. Suess classics on display
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